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5 Habits of Highly Successful People

Published on 10/1/2015 by K Scott

“If you don’t know where you’re going, you might end up some place else.”
– Yogi Berra

Success, unlike most other pursuits in life, is not a journey. It’s a destination. Unless you’re one of the lucky few who have had prosperity-laden lightning bolts strike them twice after scratching the winning lotto ticket, you have to have a game plan in effect to score that winning touchdown.

While there is no set roadmap for achieving professional nirvana, here are five tips to keep in mind as you trek along the professional trail to Success Mountain.

1. Look for opportunities where others see nothing.
Louis Pasteur discovered a treatment for a disease you may have heard of: rabies. Where others threw their hands up and believed there would never be a way to rid the world of this malady, Pasteur looked in their direction, said, “Pffft!” and burned the midnight oil until he reached his goal.

2. Others may be more talented but effort and enthusiasm can trump ability.
Tim Tebow is to elite quarterbacks what Burt Bacharach is to heavy metal. Tim’s throwing style can be described as a duck dying in slow motion while nose diving. But Tebow has been a winner at the high school, collegiate, and, to an extent, the NFL level. His heart is larger than a defensive tackle’s belly after an all-you-can-eat pasta buffet, and he leaves all he has on the field. Even when he’s not in the game, he’s pumping up his teammates.

3. Visualize and plan the result(s) you wish to achieve. 
You gotta see it to be it, right?

4. Don’t hang out with negative people.
You are the company you keep, as the old saying goes. There’s a sort of subliminal peer pressure to be like the crowd you’re in so, for best results (and the good kind of peer pressure), hang out with positive and success-driven people.

5. Swim against the tide.
When others are playing, you’re working. While others rest, you’re hustling. Don’t go with the flow if it keeps you from realizing your goal(s)

6. Don’t rationalize failure.
Use it as a learning tool, yes, but don’t make excuses. It wasn’t your dog’s fault, it wasn’t because it was too hot. Find out what went wrong, correct it, and push on!

But you listed six reasons, Mr. Writer Guy, not five!

Yes, I did, didn’t I? Highly successful people tend to give more than is required.